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Texture Building in cardmaking

Texture Building

Creating a card that has a textured feel in your hand is a work of art. There are many ways to create texture such as embossing or something simple like adding ribbon. In today’s card, I’ve packed in several different texture building skills to lend lots of creative possibilities for you to try on your own. If you would like to hold this card in your hands, leave a comment on this post and I will choose someone at random to receive this card. How exciting!

 

 

building texture

Design Details

Texture Building in Layers

Texture building with layers will also give a look of dimension. Foam adhesive in the form of Stampin Dimensionals are the easiest way to get great results. The seashells in today’s project are stamped with So Many Shells stamp set. This is a layering stamp set, allowing the images to be stamped directly on top of one another for a natural looking image with dimension. Raising the sentiment is also a great way to draw attention to the message conveyed the project. Texture building in layers brings results in a snap!

 

Texture Building on a Background

With the new Embossing Paste and many background stamps, we crafters have more possibilities then ever! One must have tool is a great all-occasion background stamp. Adding a bit of heat embossing to this image will give not only a nice look but it creates a sensation of touch. Who can resist running their fingers over a heat embossed card? As another option, I also added copper heat embossing around the sentiment. This technique will bring in the eye to read and the fingers to feel. One simple addition of heat embossing is a rescue 911 to save any card project!

 

Texture Building with Embellishments

Texture building with embellishments is perhaps the most eye catching technique. I’ve used Copper Trim for this project in two ways. First is a length of trim wrapped around the card like ribbon. This trim is spectacular to look at in person, giving off lots of sparkle. The same trim takes on a completely different look when cut or frayed. The wired strands poke out like tendrils and beg to be touched. Attached to the sentiment in a layer under the paper helps it to become a natural look to the project and transition into the texture of the shells and background. Add sequins and the eye flows up and down the card. Copper Trim is another must have product and holds so many possibilities. You’ve gotta try it!

          building texture         building texture

 

Measurements for this project

Crumb Cake card base: 5 1/2″ x 8 1/4″, scored at 4 1/4″
Whisper White card stock panel: 4″ x 5 1/4″ + scraps to stamp & fussy cut

 

 

 

 

building texture

Here is a list of supplies I used to make this card project. Links are here that you can click to get product info and purchase items, at no additional cost to you, as well. Thank you for your support with your purchase 🙂

New products are available now, get them NOW in your starter kit by clicking here

 

 

 

 

This project builds texture upon texture in a way to allow you to learn and recreate an element in your own crafting experience. Perhaps choosing one element from this project is a great way to start texture building in your cards today. Would you like to share your card project on my blog? Email me a photo and I will give you a shout out! Thanks for stopping by today.

-Jenny Hall

YOUR Independent Stampin’ Up! Demonstrator

 

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In answer to many questions, yes I am a Stampin’ Up! Demonstrator and YES you can join my team. I have a non-geographical team, which means you can live anywhere in the US and participate on my team. I hold monthly meetings via FaceBook LIVE in which you assemble a prepared project. Now is the best time to join as a hobby demo. It’s a win=win for you !

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